Does it really matter the type of mold(s) in my house – building?

Often times when I arrive for a mold assessment/inspection the question often comes up, “Is this the ‘bad mold’ or the ‘good mold’?  My first response is I don’t know because I do not give a physical or verbal interpretation of what I am dealing with. In other words if people are concerned about the types of mold present then sampling will be conducted and sent to a qualified AIHA Microbiological laboratory to determine its species. There may be more than one species  in a suspected room or in the sampling. This is the value of the  lab because I am just the messenger assessing the physical aspects of the property and its building envelope.  it is best find out as much information of the properties history when it has come to past flooding, water leaks, roof leaks, ice dams, past mold contamination, etc.

Getting back to the question of good or bad mold type. My response, to the house or building it does not necessarily matter because the property does not have lungs where humans and animals breathe in the contaminated air.  The mold species are not saying to each other, ” Hey we’re Aspergillus, Cladosporium, Penicillium, or Stachybotrys ‘Black mold’, etc. You get my point. Mold fungi in buildings  will eat at the substrate and organic matter of porous materials such as wallboard, ceilings, cardboard, clothing, furniture, carpets, storage, etc. The source it needs is an excess moisture content such as flooding, water leaks (over 48 hours), excess relative humidity over 60%, etc.  Removing and treating the mold is important to prevent the property from devaluation irrelevant to the type of mold species. In many cases remodeling will also have to be conducted after proper professional cleaning of mold fungi. Remember, the key is to stop the source of the water-moisture problem before remediating.

The importance of good and bad mold to humans and pet is because we are breathing in these allergenic, pathogenic, and toxigenic type mold species. “The term ‘toxic mold’ is not necessarily accurate but there are certain mold fungi that can produce toxins (specifically mycotoxins), the mold themselves are not necessarily toxic or poisonous. ” (See – CDC Mold questions & Answer).

In other words all mold species should be treated the same with respect to health risks and removal, wether good, bad, or the ugly mold species. People with allergies, asthma, immune suppression are more susceptible to potential fungal infections. It is best to consult with an experienced physician when it comes to these type of health problems. Our job is to conduct a professional assessment and inspection not to give any medical advice (which we do not by the way).

One more point. I have heard realtors say to their clients or buyers client that this is not the bad mold!  Again, it is irrelevant to the type of mold in the property. If the property needs professional remediation, then it needs to be addressed professionally and with the proper standard of care. Let us do our job to help point you in the right direction. Environmental Resources does not remediate so we help all parties involved both the buyer and the seller when it comes to the transaction. It is best not to use a remedial company to test and inspect so there is no conflict of interest. Their job is to do the cleaning.  If there are no health concerns but mold is present you don’t always have to test but have the mold removed in a professional manner.

Andy Provitola-CMC

Environmental Resources LLC

http://www.airenvironments.com